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Indoor-pool-during-lightning, 5 myths about indoor pools and lightning 1. indoor pool facilities are typically bonded and grounded so they are safe while bonded and grounded buildings that are bonded and grounded make it easier for lightning to travel to the ground without resistance, they are not safe when it comes to water.. Ninety-five percent of all fatal lightning strikes occur outdoors, not indoors. the decision to close indoor swimming pools during these storms is based on irrational fears rather than objective facts., first of all, the safety record of indoor pool facilities as it relates to lightning cannot be discounted. no death has been recorded to date from lightning during indoor swimming activities. the u.s. consumer product safety commission reported 60 swimming pool electrocutions between 1990 and 2003, and none were from lightning..

Pool safety is our priority. storms can happen anytime no matter where you live and the goal is to educate you about swimming pools and lightning & how you can implement techniques against possible dangers. after the storm, call pool troopers to keep your pool free from debris left by wind & rain., your very own aquatic therapy webinars - preapproved click here for 7 webinar bundle (save $180) for individuals and $395 for facility access, up to 30 people. you asked for it; you got it. pre-recorded 1-hour webinars approved in 36 states (see below for....

Lightning safety at indoor pools faq within in the aquatic community there continues to be debate over the need for closing indoor pools during proximate lightning activity. while it has long been established a best practice at outdoor facilities, there is no consensus on the need for pool evacuation at indoor aquatic facilities., it states that “there are several documented instances of lightning striking ymca indoor pools through glass or open windows and contacting the pool bottom, bleachers, or a lifeguard chair” (but....

Is it safe to swim in an indoor pool during a lightning storm? if the building has a proper lightning protection system, it is probably safe. but why test the envelope? you only have one life., in 2008, tom griffiths and matthew griffith co-wrote an article for aquatics international titled “when lightning strikes,” in which they took aim at a popular "urban legend" in aquatics that says indoor pools [waterparks included] should close in the event of lightning.. aquatics international later followed up the piece with a poll in 2013 asking readers whether or not indoor facilities ....

Indoor pool and pool area should lightning or thunder occur within 6-8 miles and waiting 30 minutes from last observations of either thunder or lightning before permitting persons back into the pool area. he points out that just because we haven't found statistical evidence of indoor pool deaths doesn't prove that